Edward Snowden and Timothy McVeigh

Ed, we never knew you.

Ed Snowden has never been a crusader for human rights or privacy.  He betrayed his country, plain and simple, and he made the world a much more dangerous place.  True, the NSA was going out of control, but that is no excuse to dump 7 terabytes of highly classified material into the hands of people who really want to harm the rest of us.

Snowden’s meal ticket in Moscow had to be paid for, which he seems to have done gladly.  Problem is that traitors tend to not end well.

On the NSA’s side of this fiasco, one wonders how someone could download and abscond with 7 terabytes of classified material–with nobody noticing.

Snowden is just like Timothy McVeigh, another guy who failed to be in US Special Forces.  Only the building that Snowden blew up was not in Oklahoma City, but a black cube with no windows in Maryland–one full of people with a legitimate and honorable mandate.

Don’t jump on the Snowden bandwagon.  In fact, even Bruce Schneier, someone who deserves enormous respect in the cryptography field,  has gotten Snowden wrong.  Snowden’s betrayal is clear.  An arsonist  is an arsonist  because of the crime committed.  Schneier thinks we have to wait ten years to settle our minds on Snowden.  No.  What if another terror attack happens in France, Sweden, the US, etc., and it proves to have been enabled by Snowden–something that may have already happened.

Traitors do not end well, and most of the public does not understand the enormity of his crime.  If he had only exposed a few pieces of information after running to Uruguay, then one might be able to cut him some slack.  But that is not what he did–he ran to Moscow as their gift from the sky, and he joined the ranks of those who have betrayed their country.

Yes, he was right to be concerned about what he saw going on around him, but then he lost his marbles and made the whole world less safe:  he emboldened terrorists and the enemies of freedom during the fight against them.

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